Canine Seizures: What to do if Your Dog is Suffering from Seizures

Canine Seizures: What to do if Your Dog is Suffering from Seizures

 Canine Seizures – What You Can Do

Seizures can be a terrifying thing to witness, but they’re a relatively common and often harmless problem in dogs. Many puppies inherit a genetic tendency towards them, while others may suffer from them as a result of brain injuries or other traumatic events. Learning how to handle a canine seizure and when to seek veterinary help is an essential skill for any dog owner.

Canine Seizures: What to do if Your Dog is Suffering from Seizures

Know What They Look Like

When most people think of seizures, they think of someone falling to the ground and convulsing wildly. Dogs do experience that type of seizure, but there are other common symptoms as well. Many dogs have absence seizures, where the animal may still stand or lay as usual but seem confused and disoriented. During absence seizures, dogs often snap at thin air. Other seizures may make the dog appear catatonic or paralyzed.

Leave Your Puppy Alone

While you may want to rush over and try to soothe your puppy, the best way to handle the situation is to simply leave your dog alone. Only move him if he is near a potential hazard, such as a flight of stairs or a table with lamps or other heavy objects that could fall on him. Do not attempt to pin your dog down or place any objects in his mouth. These actions can result in broken bones or other injuries.

Monitor and Collect Evidence

As soon as the seizure begins, make a note of the time and keep an eye on it. Note how many seizures they are having and the duration of each. If you’re worried about your puppy and their seizures, it’s time to seek immediate veterinary attention from professionals like those at Seattle Emergency Veterinary Hospital.

While you are monitoring your puppy, make sure to note the symptoms in as much detail as possible. Take a video of the seizure if you have a smartphone or other camera handy. This may help your veterinarian diagnose the cause or determine treatment.

Call Your Vet

While most canine seizures aren’t a medical emergency, some can be caused by tumors, poisoning, and other serious illnesses. If this is your dog’s first seizure, or if the seizure is unusually long or part of an unusual cluster of seizures, call your vet immediately for further advice.

Conclusion

Seizures look terrifying, but they are usually harmless and over quickly. Remain calm, make sure your puppy is safe and make a record of the symptoms. With that information, your veterinarian can help you determine the best course of action to keep your beloved pet safe and happy.

Animal Bliss - A really cool blog about Animals - domestic pets and wildlife too.

Animal Bliss - A really cool blog about Animals - domestic pets and wildlife too.

MY QUESTION FOR YOU TODAY:

Does your dog (or cat) have seizures?

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Jeanne Melanson, Founder of Animal Bliss, a very cool blog about animals - wildlife and domestic too

Animal Bliss - A really cool blog about Animals - domestic pets and wildlife too.

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Emma Sturgis
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Emma Sturgis

Emma is a freelance writer based in Boston, MA. When not writing, she enjoys baking and playing catch with her black Labrador Harlan. Questions? Say hi on Twitter or Facebook.
Emma Sturgis
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