General Information about Bearded Dragons

Information About Bearded Dragons, Pagona Genus

Information About Bearded Dragons

Pagona Genus

Today I am sharing some general information about Bearded Dragons with you. Why?  Because I’ve recently become a Bearded Dragon junky.   Maybe you’d like to join me in my addiction?  🙂  Isn’t this one a handsome one?

General Information about Bearded Dragons

>General Information about Bearded Dragons

The term “bearded dragon” is most commonly used to describe the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), as in the image above. Pogona is a genus of reptiles containing eight species, which are often known by the common name Bearded Dragons.

The name “bearded dragon” refers to the “beard” of the lizard, the underside of the throat which turns black if they are stressed or see a potential rival or predator.  Members of this family live in the arid, rocky, semi-desert regions and dry open woodlands of Australia.

They are adept climbers and spend most of their time on branches and in bushes, and can also be found living near human habitation. Pogona species bask on rocks and exposed branches in the mornings and afternoons. They are found throughout Australia.

Several species of this genus, especially the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), are often kept as pets or exhibited in zoos due to their hardy nature and easy care in comparison to other exotic reptiles.

General information about bearded dragons

General Information About Bearded Dragons – Description

The genus is in the subfamily Agaminae of the family Agamidae. Part of the Lizard family, their characteristics include broad, triangular heads and flattened bodies with spiny scales arranged in rows and clusters. These are found on the throat, which can be expanded when threatened and at the back of the head. These spiny scales are used to scare off predators, yet they are not very sharp.

Bearded dragons display a hand-waving gesture to show submission, and a head-bobbing display to show dominance between dragons. They have the ability to change color during rivalry challenges between males, in response to ambient temperature changes such as turning black to absorb heat, and other stimuli.

Males grow up to 40 to 60 cm (16 to 24 in) long, and females up to 30 to 51 cm (12 to 20 in).

General Information About Bearded Dragons – In captivity

Bearded dragons — most commonly, the inland or central bearded dragon — are kept as pets. They were first Introduced as pets in the United States during the 1990s, and they continue to be a popular exotic species pet even though Australia, from the 1960s onward, has banned the sale of its wildlife to the pet trade  They are a popular species among children because of their friendly and calm nature, and the relative ease of caring for them.

Generally speaking, the bearded dragon is a solitary animal but sometimes female dragons of similar size will often happily live together. Male bearded dragons are usually housed alone, as they will fight with other males and breed with females.

Captive adults reach about 42 to 61 cm (16 to 24 in) from head to tail, weigh 350 to 600 g (10 to 20 oz) and live for about 8 to 12 years with good care.

General Information About Bearded Dragons – Diet

Captive adult bearded dragon’s diet typically consists mostly of leafy greens, vegetables, and non-citrus fruits, supplemented regularly with insects. Juvenile and baby bearded dragon diets consist mainly of insects (juvenile pellets can be bought at shops). Crickets are the most popular insects fed to bearded dragons, but they can also be fed other insects such as black soldier fly larvae, locusts, super worms, waxworms, silkworms, butter worms, grasshoppers, hornworms, and even some varieties of roaches. Mealworms should be considered a snack for bearded dragons because they contain a lot of fat and can lead to poor health.

Young dragons require a significantly greater insect-to-plant matter ratio in their diets than adults. About 90% of a juvenile bearded dragon’s diet is insects, but 90% of an adult’s diet is leafy greens and vegetables.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

General Information about Bearded Dragons
Jeanne and Orange Sorbet

 

Now it doesn’t seem fair to give you all this information about Bearded Dragons without introducing you to my little guy, does it?.  After all, he did help me write this post!

This is Orange Sorbet and he is still a baby at 3 months old.

General Information about Bearded Dragons
Orange Sorbet

Thanks for checking us out!

General Information About Bearded Dragons, Pagona Genus

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I hope you have enjoyed, “General Information About Bearded Dragons, Pagona Genus

You might also like to read, Hear the Mighty Roar of the DESERT RAIN FROG, World’s Cutest Frog Ever

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MY QUESTION FOR YOU TODAYDo you have any reptiles or amphibians?

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It’s just sexy!

Jeanne Melanson, Founder of Animal Bliss, a very cool blog about animals - wildlife and domestic too

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As always, thank you for taking the time to visit my blog.

♥ PEACE ♥

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Born in Nova Scotia, I moved to the United States 20+ years ago.I am a dedicated lover of animals and fight for their rights and protection.I love people too, of course, and enjoy meeting folks from all walks of life.I enjoy philosophical discussion, laughing, and really odd ball stuff.I hope you enjoy my site.Leave me a comment to let me know you were here!Peace out.
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21 thoughts on “Information About Bearded Dragons, Pagona Genus

    • Oh, Lesly! How fun is that?? I’m glad that you enjoyed my Sorbet so that it influenced you enough to decide on a Gecko. You son must be very happy. What did he name it? Thank you for letting me know!

    • Thank you, Mary. I think my little friend is cute too. 🙂 I’m not sure if chameleons and geckos eat mosquitoes, but I’ll bet they do! That is a plus. Thanks for stopping by! Come back soon.

  1. Orange Sorbet is cute Jeanne! You guys are looking good, great shot 😉 Ditto on Kelli’s comment; we see so many lizards all around the world, fascinating facts on these little guys…and if you recall we saw some 5 foot monster monitor lizards in Koh Lanta last month, almost the size of Komodo Dragons! Thanks for the share!

    • Now you have me wanting a 5 foot monster monitor lizard! I might have to move to Koh Lanta! What an awesome excuse that would be, right? Haha. Thanks for your comment, Ryan. I appreciate you.

    • Whoa, it must be very hot where you are then, Sue. Thank you for that information! I will have to look up the Blue Tongues. And, nothing is as cute as my Orange Sorbet. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by.

  2. Hey Jeanne,
    Here you again come up with a superb article!!! 🙂
    This is my second visit on your blog and it seems that you are a great animal lover, Be honestly I’m a lit bit lover of animal, and after read the article I’m became a big fan of you because being a human, you are doing a good job for animals, and its nice to see love for animals
    Thanks for sharing.
    Keep posting.

    • Kelli, glad to hear that you like lizards. I figured you were the type of person who would! They are cute, aren’t they? And FAST. I was outside sitting with my little Sorbet this evening reading a book and all of a sudden he jumped off my lap and took off into the thick bushes. My cat wanted to help catch him! Yikes! I finally found him, thank goodness! Thanks for your visit! I appreciate it. 🙂

    • I am glad that you think Sorbet is cute. So do I. 🙂 He will get anywhere from 18-24 inches long, tail included. I cant’ wait until he’s not so fragile. He’s so little now. thanks for visiting my blog today! You made MY day. 😉

  3. Right now, no pets. I am a bird person. After my parakeet died several years ago, I decided I could not give a bird proper attention – they do need a lot of attention if you keep just one. So I have been petless for a number of years. I miss my feathered companions.
    Alana recently posted…Best of AM – Mail Order ChickensMy Profile

    • Alana, I’m sorry to hear about the loss of your parakeet. I’ve never owned a bird. I think that might be fun some day, although I recognize they can be a lot of work. Thank you for taking the time to visit my blog today. Peace to you.

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